Corona virus will end in 2 years, vaccine not to be solution: WHO

August 22, 2020: World Health Organization's chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus hopes that the Coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic will end in two years just like the Spanish Flu.

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August 22, 2020: World Health Organization's chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus hopes that the Coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic will end in two years just like the Spanish Flu. However, vaccines would not be the solution for the pandemic, says the WHO chief. Ghebreyesus discussed his opinions and stood in the current global crisis in a webinar, as part WHO's regular briefing, reported by Independent.

The WHO chief said on Friday he hopes the world can finish the coronavirus pandemic in less than two years. Ghebreyesus was answering questions about the comparison between the last century's Spanish flu, and the novel coronavirus afflicting the world at a webinar. He said the Spanish flu lasted from February 1918 to April 1920. "So, it took two years to stop. And in our situation now with more technology and of course we have a disadvantage of globalization, closeness, connectedness but an advantage of better technology, so we hope to finish this pandemic in less than two years," he said.

"A vaccine will be a vital tool, and we hope that we will have one as soon as possible. But there's no guarantee that we will, and even if we do have a vaccine, it won't end the pandemic on its own." He said the people need to learn to control and manage the virus using the tools they have "and to make the adjustments to our daily lives that are needed to keep ourselves and each other safe."

The director-general said that several countries are experiencing fresh outbreaks after a long period with little or no transmission. "These countries are a cautionary tale for those that are now seeing a downward trend in cases. Progress does not mean victory." He said that no country can just ride this out until we have a vaccine. The 21st century is at a disadvantage for being "globally close" to one another due to ease in connectivity and globalization; however, the modern marvels of technology are advantageous for the current generation to utilize in stopping the virus.

Currently, the world faces the coronavirus's threats with no known cures and vaccines, imposing only strict lockdowns and doing its best to minimize the risk of infection. The world tallies 23.09 million positive cases and 802,000 deaths of COVID-19, according to Worldometers.

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