James Webb Telescope’s 1st Image of Galaxy Cluster 13 BN Years Ago

DY365
DY365
Published: July 12,2022 12:29 PM
DY365

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US President Joe Biden on Monday released one of the James Webb Space Telescope’s first images in a preview event at the White House in Washington

July 12, 2022: US President Joe Biden on Monday released one of the James Webb Space Telescope’s first images in a preview event at the White House in Washington.



This first image from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date.



Known as Webb’s First Deep Field, the image shows SMACS 0723, where a massive group of galaxy clusters act as a magnifying glass for the objects behind them. Called gravitational lensing, this created Webb's first deep field view of incredibly old and distant, faint galaxies.



"It is the deepest image of our universe that has ever been taken," according to NASA Administrator Bill Nelson.



 Some of these distant galaxies and star clusters have never been seen before. The galaxy cluster is shown as it appeared 4.6 billion years ago.



"This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm's length by someone on the ground," according to a NASA release.



The image, taken by Webb's Near-Infrared Camera, is composed of images taken at different wavelengths of light over the course of 12.5 hours. The Hubble Space Telescope's deepest fields took weeks to capture.



The rest of the high-resolution colour images will be released today, Tuesday, July 12.